24.09.2019

Ramones Pleasant Dreams Expanded Remastered Rar

With the three-chord assault of 'Blitzkrieg Bop,' The Ramones begins at a blinding speed and never once over the course of its 14 songs does it let up. The Ramones is all about speed, hooks, stupidity, and simplicity. The songs are imaginative reductions of early rock & roll, girl group pop, and surf rock. Not only is the music boiled down to its essentials, but the Ramones offer a twisted, comical take on pop culture with their lyrics, whether it's the horror schlock of 'I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement,' the gleeful violence of 'Beat on the Brat,' or the maniacal stupidity of 'Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue.' And the cover of Chris Montez's 'Let's Dance' isn't a throwaway - with its single-minded beat and lyrics, it encapsulates everything the group loves about pre-Beatles rock & roll. They don't alter the structure, or the intent, of the song, they simply make it louder and faster. And that's the key to all of the Ramones' music - it's simple rock & roll, played simply, loud, and very, very fast.

  1. Ramones Pleasant Dreams Album
  2. Unplugged: Expanded & Remastered
  3. Rumours (expanded & Remastered) - Disc 2 Of 2

None of the songs clock in at any longer than two and half minutes, and most are considerably shorter. In comparison to some of the music the album inspired, The Ramones sounds a little tame - it's a little too clean, and compared to their insanely fast live albums, it even sounds a little slow - but there's no denying that it still sounds brilliantly fresh and intoxicatingly fun.

1976 - Ramones (2001. Expanded & Remastered): Download 1976 - Ramones: Download 1977 - Leave Home. 1981 - Pleasant Dreams (2002. Expanded & Remastered): Download. Listen to Pleasant Dreams (Expanded & Remastered) now. Listen to Pleasant Dreams (Expanded & Remastered) in full in the Spotify app. Play on Spotify.

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Stephen Thomas Erlewine. The years go by and the legacy left by the Ramones still puts down more and more roots in the great history of the pop music of the twentieth century. The false brothers from Queens have actually never taken their dirty and used Converse elsewhere than down the beaten path of a certain rock’n’roll tradition going from surf music to girl groups. With stupidity as philosophy, teenage insouciance as credo, supersonic guitars as weapons of mass destruction, their albums—binary in their form, really enjoyable in their content—give birth to hymns of bubble-gum pop on amphetamines that are a lot more serious than they seem.

Just like this Leave Home, their second studio album released in January 1977, only nine months after their first one! A good thumb in the nose of the rock scene, with, in the role of the icing on the cake, classics like I Remember and, above all, Pinhead, from which comes their famous battle cry: Gabba Gabba Hey! In 80 titles splits on 3 CDs, this generous deluxe remastered edition celebrates the fortieth birthday of this masterpiece that couldn’t have been more influential, overloaded with demos, B sides, remixes and live titles recorded in 1977 at the CBGB, the New-York punk mecca. In short, our verdict is in: gabba gabba hey! The rules of the game were certainly perfectly clear after their first album: in the third instalment of the Ramones' story, they surpassed themselves. And even refined their art!

Once again, with this Rocket to Russia, released on 4 November 1977, at the height of the Cold War, it was all about three-chord symphonies, enthusiastically cretinous and 100% adolescent hi-jinks and above all, taking rock'n'roll back to its birthplace: the garage! But the refrains of Sheena Is A Punk Rocker or Teenage Lobotomy are peerless in their re–imagining of their rock’n’roll, bubblegum pop and surf heritage.

And even when they cover the cult tracks Surfin’ Bird by the Trashmen or Do You Wanna Dance? (made famous by Cliff Richard, the Beach Boys and even Bette Midler) our delinquent punks from Queens produced savage and raw rock like nobody else! This edition to mark the 40th birthday of this sublime sonic attack offers two mixes of the album: the original, and a new mix, entitled Tracking Mix by Ed Stasium, the sound engineer on the original release.

It also includes 24 rare or unreleased tracks, demos, alternative versions and B–sides. And the cherry on the cake is a dazzling, unreleased live version by the four Ramones brothers (all from other mothers) recorded on 19 December 1977 the Apollo Centre in Glasgow, Scotland. The Ramones provided the blueprint and Leave Home duplicated it with lesser results, but the Ramones' third album, Rocket to Russia, perfected it. Rocket to Russia boasts a cleaner production than its predecessors, which only gives the Ramones' music more force. It helps that the group wrote its finest set of songs for the album. From the mindless, bopping opening of 'Cretin Hop' and 'Rockaway Beach' to the urban surf rock of 'Sheena Is a Punk Rocker' and the ridiculous anthem 'Teenage Lobotomy,' the songs are teeming with irresistibly catchy hooks; even their choice of covers, 'Do You Want to Dance?'

And 'Surfin' Bird,' provide more hooks than usual. The Ramones also branch out slightly, adding ballads to the mix. Even with these (relatively) slower songs, the speed of the album never decreases. However, the abundance of hooks and slight variety in tempos makes Rocket to Russia the Ramones' most listenable and enjoyable album - it doesn't have the revolutionary impact of The Ramones, but it's a better album and one of the finest records of the late '70s. Stephen Thomas Erlewine. Second verse, not quite like the first.

Album

Released a mere nine months after the Ramones' groundbreaking debut, 1977's Leave Home was in many respects a continuation of the sound and attitude of the first album, with its unrelenting barrage of chunky guitar downstrokes and Mad Magazine-influenced lyrical absurdity. But even a cursory listen reveals the Ramones had made plenty of progress in less than a year. The performances on Leave Home are tighter and better focused than they were on Ramones, and Tommy Ramone's minimalist drumming gained a bit of swing that was absent on the debut. The Ramones sound more comfortable with their attack, never quite as simple as it seems, while also bearing down with a greater speed and ferocity that finds them hitting their stride in the studio. Just as importantly, the production is noticeably more polished this time out, which helps more than one might expect.

Without the strict left/right separation of Ramones, Leave Home is more friendly to the ear, and the increased clarity does wonders for the passionate bleat of Joey's vocals, Johnny's unrelenting Mosrite abuse, and the melodic details that lurk beneath the surface of the Ramones' wall of noise. And if the first album was full of immediate classics, Leave Home has more than its share of great tunes, including the anthemic 'Pinhead' and 'Commando,' the high-velocity teen romance of 'Oh Oh I Love Her So' (certainly the greatest love story ever set at a Burger King), and the catchy invitations to bad behavior in 'Carbona Not Glue' and 'Glad to See You Go.'

Leave Home wasn't as startling as the Ramones' first album, and it's not quite as strong and consistent as their masterpiece Rocket to Russia, but it was a positive step forward for the Pride of Forest Hills, and it's one of their best and most satisfying albums. Mark Deming. Not many bands can honestly say they changed the shape of rock & roll as we know it and upended part of the larger global culture at the same time. The Ramones did just that; by stripping down and speeding up rock & roll like a hot rod that could outrun all competition, and injecting it with a massive dose of snotty, absurdist humor, they gave the music a new lease on life, and left behind a handful of brilliant recordings that are still a solid kick to hear nearly four decades after their debut hit the streets.

Ramones Pleasant Dreams Expanded Remastered Rar

Punk rock first emerged from a very specific time and place, but the best of it is timeless in its joyous roar, and the first four Ramones albums absolutely live up to that description. Those four albums - 1976's Ramones, 1977's Leave Home, 1977's Rocket to Russia, and 1978's Road to Ruin - are included in the box set The Sire Years 1976-1981, along with 1980's End of the Century (a conceptually brilliant but musically flawed collaboration with producer Phil Spector) and 1981's Pleasant Dreams (the first Ramones album that could have been described as blah, though it has a few great tunes, most notably 'The KKK Took My Baby Away' and '7-11'). The six albums appear here in the same crisp-sounding remasters that appeared in 2001 and 2002, but have been stripped of their bonus tracks, which makes one wonder why Rhino/Warner Bros. Didn't opt for a three-disc set, since the albums are short enough to fit two to a CD.

And while each disc gets its own cardboard sleeve that replicates the original LP artwork, there are no liner notes or any kind of accompanying booklet that would include the credits. One can quibble about the packaging and presentation of The Sire Years, yet there's no denying the strength of this music; the first four Ramones albums are essential to any decent collection of rock & roll, and though End of the Century and Pleasant Dreams pale in comparison, they still wipe the floor with nearly all of the thousands of bands who followed the Ramones' example. This isn't the ideal presentation of this music, but if your Ramones collection has mysteriously disappeared, this will catch you up on their most essential albums in one fell swoop and then some. Mark Deming. Though it contains one of the Ramones' biggest radio hits, 'Pet Sematary' (written for Stephen King's movie of the same name), 1989's Brain Drain finds the 'bruthas' from Queens at an all-time inspirational low. And since the aforementioned track is actually reviled by most of the band's hardcore fans, the listener has to make do with opener 'I Believe in Miracles' and closer 'Merry Christmas (I Don't Want to Fight Tonight),' which bookend the amazingly dull tracks in between with the record's only bright moments. The final Ramones album recorded for Sire Records (their label from day one), Brain Drain was sadly also the last to feature bassist and creative leader Dee Dee Ramone.

Eduardo Rivadavia. A new record deal and the addition of an enthusiastic new bassist (C.J. Ramone) revitalized the Ramones, making Mondo Bizarro the band's strongest release in years.

Returning longtime producer Ed Stasium certainly deserves much credit for helping the 'bruthas' rediscover their unique combination of pop hooks, savage guitar riffing, and most importantly, sense of humor. This is immediately obvious on songs like 'Censorshit' (which addresses the Tipper Gore - P.M.R.C. Issue), 'The Job That Ate My Brain,' and the absolutely hilarious 'Cabbies on Crack.' Recently departed charter member Dee Dee Ramone also contributes a few surprisingly commercial (but still awesome) songs in 'Poison Heart' and 'Strength to Endure,' the latter is sung by rookie C.J. 'I Won't let it Happen' as an acoustic ballad in the classic Ramones mold. Although 'Touring' is little more than a poor remake of 'Rock'n'Roll High School,' Mondo Bizarro still marks a solid return to form for punk rock's greatest institution.

Eduardo Rivadavia. Road to Ruin found the Ramones stretching their signature sound to its limits; even though there were several fine moments, nearly all of them arrived when the group broke free from the suddenly restrictive loud-fast-hard formula of their first records. Considering that the Ramones did desire mainstream success and that they had a deep love for early-'60s pop/rock, it's not surprising that they decided to shake loose the constrictions of their style by making an unabashed pop album, yet it was odd that Phil Spector produced End of the Century, because his painstaking working methods seemingly clashed with the Ramones' instinctual approach. However, the Ramones were always more clever than they appeared, so the matching actually worked better than it could have. Spector's detailed production helped bring 'Rock 'n' Roll High School' and 'Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio?' To life, yet it also kept some of the punkier numbers in check.

Even so, End of the Century is more enjoyable than its predecessor, since the record has stronger material, and in retrospect, it's one of their better records of the '80s. Stephen Thomas Erlewine.

Ramones Pleasant Dreams Album

Expanded

Road to Ruin found the Ramones stretching their signature sound to its limits; even though there were several fine moments, nearly all of them arrived when the group broke free from the suddenly restrictive loud-fast-hard formula of their first records. Considering that the Ramones did desire mainstream success and that they had a deep love for early-'60s pop/rock, it's not surprising that they decided to shake loose the constrictions of their style by making an unabashed pop album, yet it was odd that Phil Spector produced End of the Century, because his painstaking working methods seemingly clashed with the Ramones' instinctual approach.

However, the Ramones were always more clever than they appeared, so the matching actually worked better than it could have. Spector's detailed production helped bring 'Rock 'n' Roll High School' and 'Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio?'

To life, yet it also kept some of the punkier numbers in check. Even so, End of the Century is more enjoyable than its predecessor, since the record has stronger material, and in retrospect, it's one of their better records of the '80s. Stephen Thomas Erlewine.

Ramones DiscographyThe complete Ramones discography. This also includes solo albums from members of the ramones + different tribute-albums, bootlegs & demo sessions. The bitrate on the albums is the best I could find. Thank you SO much for the torrent, and thanks to the seeders! I have all the original albums on vinyl, and a couple on cassette, and the collections I have on cd.but you have filled in the gaps with some of the live stuff and the stuff from DeeDee that I didn't have!

Unplugged: Expanded & Remastered

Not to mention, my turntable hasn't worked in years, and sometimes you want to listen to an album, not EVERYTHING in any old order like the anthologies give! This torrent has good sound, good quality, is well organized, and suits my purposes PERFECTLY!

Rumours (expanded & Remastered) - Disc 2 Of 2

On another note, the Ramones have been my favorite band since I first heard and saw them on Rock & Roll High School (Love PJ Soles, too, hehe)as a teen in the early 80's. Sad that the entire band except for the drummers and replacement bassist (sorry, CJ, you just ain't DeeDee!) are dead. 14 years I think it's been, for Joey, RIP.